12,000

We have over 12,000 students, from over 100 countries, within one of the safest campuses in the UK

93%

93% of Lancaster students go into work or further study within six months of graduating

Home > Research > Researchers > Brett Bligh
View graph of relations

Current Postgraduate Research Students

Brett Bligh supervises 6 postgraduate research students. Some of the students have produced research profiles, these are listed below:

« Back

Dr Brett Bligh

Lecturer

Brett Bligh

County South

Lancaster University

Bailrigg

Lancaster LA1 4YL

United Kingdom

Tel: +44 1524 592863

Location:

Research overview

Brett Bligh is a Lecturer in the Department for Educational Research. He conducts research into the connections between our material surroundings, the technologies that permeate them, and the ways we act, think and learn. Two recurring interests are how Universities design and evaluate their built environment estate to support opportunities for learning, and how very large display tools can support learners’ collaboration. More general interests include Activity Theory and collaborative learning. In 2012 he co-authored Nesta's Decoding Learning report, and was previously a member of the EU's "STELLAR" Network of Excellence for Technology Enhanced Learning. In 2010, as part of the Visual Learning Lab, he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for innovation in teaching and learning.

PhD supervision

I am interested in research proposals that investigate the connections between our material surroundings, the technologies that permeate them, and the ways we act, think and learn. Such proposals might focus on technology and/or policy. Some indicative examples of suitable areas: participative design of learning spaces; pedagogically-informed institutional evaluation of campus infrastructure; investigations of how learners experience spaces; use of ubiquitous technologies (from mobile devices to wall-sized screens) to support large and small-group teaching and learning. I am also interested in Activity Theory, either to underpin the kinds of research already described, or as an area of inquiry in its own right.

View all (13) »