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Home > Research > Researchers > John Towse
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Current Postgraduate Research Students

John Towse supervises 8 postgraduate research students. Some of the students have produced research profiles, these are listed below:

Student research profiles

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Dr John Towse

Senior Lecturer

John Towse

Fylde College

Lancaster University

Bailrigg

Lancaster LA1 4YF

United Kingdom

Tel: +44 1524 593705

Location:

Research Interests

My work spans a number of research topics. Here is an overview of some of project I have been involved with

Working memory

Working memory refers to the active maintenance of transient information. We know that working memory is very important, for children's development and for adult cognitive skills. Tasks that measure working memory are often very good at predicting mathematics, reading, comprhension processes and so on. My research has attempted to document the relations between working memory and cognition, as well as develop more complete theoretical accounts of how working memory processes unfold.

Executive functions

Executive functions relate the the effective regulation of behaviours towards goals, targets, cognitions and responses. Executive functions form a complex interrelated set of behaviours. So it is important to understand how regulation takes place, the limits and the opportunities that they provide.

Mathematical cognition

Several research projects attempt to understand how children's understanding of mathematics concepts and mathematics processes unfold. We explore how education and cognitive development impact on the important domain of mathematics.

Cybercognition

Online environments are increasingly ubiquitous; we communicate through email, we browse websites, we live our lives through social media, etc. This presents cognitive systems with great challenges. We interact with complex systems involving many -sometimes unknown - permuations and consequences, and we are required to trust individuals and systems despite sometimes scanty evidence to justify this. We seek to understand how cognitive decisions interact with computer systems, devices and expectations.

Bibliometrics

Links to graphs describing citation networks of who I work with and who cites my work

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  • Hon Sec

    Activity: External academic engagementMembership of external research organisation

  • Journal of Numerical Cognition

    Activity: Editorial work or peer review of publicationsEditorial activity

  • Member

    Activity: External academic engagementMembership of peer review panel or committee

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