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Home > Research > Researchers > Robin Long
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Dr Robin Long

Research Associate

Robin Long

Physics Building

Lancaster University

Bailrigg

Lancaster LA1 4YB

United Kingdom

Tel: +44 1524 592278

Location: B43b

Research Interests

My research interests are divided into two main areas:

  • Top Quarks, and their use in searching for FCNC.
  • The development of Grid computing systems to serve the huge processing and storage requirements of particle physics

I started work on ATLAS in 2008 when I started my PhD at Lancaster.  My studies on ATLAS have always related to Top quarks.   The top quark is the heavest of the known fundamental particles. The top quarks large mass, roughly 35 times larger than the bottom quarks, is close to the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking.  Such a large mass suggest the top quark could play afavourable role in new physics searches.

The top quark decays primarily to a bottom quark and a W boson. The standard model predicts that the top quark can decay into a Higgs Boson and a lighter quark (up or strange). The probability of this happening is so low that it is beyond the ability of ATLAS to detect.  As such any evidence of such a decay would imply the existence of beyond the standard model physics.

Along with Guennadi Borissov I have begun looking for such decays in ATLAS.  We are interested in those decays where the Higgs boson (from a top quark) decays to two W bosons, both of which the decay to leptons, and where the other top quark decays to a W boson that also decays leptonically.

In 2012 I started work as a Research Associate on GridPP.   In this role I support the running of a computing farm at Lancaster which forms part of the NorthGrid Tier2 (which is spread over Lancaster, Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield).  I have been looking into ways that a cloud computing struture could enhance ability of grid computing to serve the needs of particle physics (especially in relation to ATLAS); and how this could be achieved using VMWare.

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