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  • Looking through dementia R2

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Qualitative Health Research, 29 (7), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Qualitative Health Research page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/qhr on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Looking through dementia: what do commercial stock images tell us about aging and cognitive decline?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/07/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Qualitative Health Research
Issue number7
Volume29
Number of pages17
Pages (from-to)987-1003
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date6/12/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Commercial stock images are existing, artificially constructed visuals used by businesses and media outlets to articulate certain values, assumptions and beliefs. Despite their pervasiveness and accessibility, little is known about the ways in which stock images communicate meanings relating to health and illness. This study examines a broad range of common stock images that depict dementia and aging, revealing the tendency for older people with dementia to be represented in objectifying and de-humanizing terms—emphasizing disease and deficit at the expense of the whole person, whereas precluding any possibility of enduring personhood. As well as introducing a multimodal critical discourse approach that can be adopted by other researchers examining the ideological underpinnings of health and illness imagery, this study underscores the importance of critically interrogating stock photography—a much neglected, yet profoundly influential, cultural resource that can shape the ways we think about and respond to illness and disease.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Qualitative Health Research, 29 (7), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Qualitative Health Research page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/qhr on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/