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    Rights statement: This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Palgrave Communications. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Who’s in charge? Corporations as institutions of global governance Christopher May Palgrave Communications 1, Article number: 15042 (2015) ​doi:10.1057/palcomms.2015.42 is available online at: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/articles/palcomms201542

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  • palcomms201542

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Who’s in charge?: corporations as institutions of global governance

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Article number15042
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>22/12/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Palgrave Communications
Volume2015
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

In most accounts of global governance, where corporations are included, they are seen as either subject to various international organisations’ regulatory impact or are identified as having (benign or malign) influence over agenda setting around the scope and practices of global regulation. However, here I examine a third dimension that has hitherto been under recognised: this article starts to develop an analysis of the terrain that global corporations govern themselves, sometime singularly, sometimes collectively and sometimes collaborating with the more “normal” institutions of global governance. I seek to develop an account of how the corporation governs this terrain and the mechanisms that businesses have developed (or utilised) to maintain their authority. I suggest that it makes sense to understand global corporations as directly analogous to more “normal” institutions of global governance, and that discussion and analysis of global governance needs to integrate this third dimension if it is to examine the full spectrum of governance beyond the state. This article is published as part of a thematic collection dedicated to global governance

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/