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  • Athanasopoulos & Albright supervised classification of motion

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Athanasopoulos, P. and Albright, D. (2016), A Perceptual Learning Approach to the Whorfian Hypothesis: Supervised Classification of Motion. Language Learning, 66: 666–689. doi:10.1111/lang.12180 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/lang.12180/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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A perceptual learning approach to the Whorfian hypothesis: supervised classification of motion

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>09/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Language Learning
Issue number3
Volume66
Number of pages24
Pages (from-to)666-689
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date19/06/16
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Recent research on the relationship between grammatical aspect and motion event cognition has shown that speakers of nonaspect languages (e.g., German, Swedish) attend to event endpoints more than speakers of aspect languages (e.g., English, Spanish). In this study, we took a perceptual learning approach to the Whorfian hypothesis, training native English speakers to categorize events either in an English-like way (same-language bias) or in a Swedish-like way (other-language bias), with and without verbal interference in English. Results showed that successful learning occurred in both language conditions. However, verbal interference disrupted learning only in the condition where the perceptual dimension to be learned was also salient in the participant's native language. This revealed selective language influence depending on the associative or dissociative relationship between the linguistic features occurring in the observer's native language and the perceptual features of the stimuli presented to them.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Athanasopoulos, P. and Albright, D. (2016), A Perceptual Learning Approach to the Whorfian Hypothesis: Supervised Classification of Motion. Language Learning, 66: 666–689. doi:10.1111/lang.12180 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/lang.12180/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.