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  • Isaacs & Harding (forthcoming, 2017)

    Rights statement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/language-teaching/article/pronunciation-assessment/AA9DD6C481AB7E5C52C5490CCD857089 The final, definitive version of this article will be published in the Journal, Language Teaching, 50 (3), pp347-366 July 2017 © 2017 Cambridge University Press.

    Accepted author manuscript, 750 KB, PDF-document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Pronunciation assessment

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Language Teaching
Issue number3
Volume50
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)347-366
<mark>State</mark>Published
Early online date31/05/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

After an extended period of being on the periphery, numerous advancements in the field of second language (L2) pronunciation over the past decade have led to increased activity and visibility for this subfield within applied linguistics research. As Derwing (2010) underscored in her 2009 plenary at the first annual Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching (PSLLT) conference, a record number of graduate students researching L2 pronunciation and subsequently launching into academic positions at international universities assures L2 pronunciation a bright future in research and teacher training. Other indicators of momentum include the focus of a Language Teaching timeline on the topic of pronunciation (Munro & Derwing 2011), the appearance of multiple encyclopedia volumes or handbooks of pronunciation (e.g. Levis & Munro 2013; Reed & Levis 2015), and the establishment of the specialized Journal of Second Language Pronunciation in 2015, which constitutes a milestone in the professionalization of the field and ‘an essential step toward a disciplinary identity’ (Levis 2015: 1).

Bibliographic note

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/language-teaching/article/pronunciation-assessment/AA9DD6C481AB7E5C52C5490CCD857089

The final, definitive version of this article will be published in the Journal, Language Teaching, 50 (3), pp347-366 July 2017 © 2017 Cambridge University Press.