Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Diagnostic assessment of reading and listening ...

Electronic data

  • Language Testing-2015-HardingAldersonBrunfaut-317-36

    Rights statement: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (http://www.uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).

    Final published version, 823 KB, PDF-document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Diagnostic assessment of reading and listening in a second or foreign language: elaborating on diagnostic principles

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Language Testing
Issue number3
Volume32
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)317-336
<mark>State</mark>Published
Early online date27/01/15
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Alderson, Brunfaut and Harding (2014) recently investigated how diagnosis is practised across a range of professions in order to develop a tentative framework for a theory of diagnosis in second or foreign language (SFL) assessment. In articulating this framework, a set of five broad
principles were proposed, encompassing the entire enterprise of diagnostic assessment. However, there remain questions about how best to implement these principles in practice, particularly in identifying learners’ strengths and weaknesses in the less well-documented areas of SFL reading and listening. In this paper, we elaborate on the set of principles by first outlining the stages of a
diagnostic process built on these principles, and then discussing the implications of this process for the diagnostic assessment of reading and listening. In doing so, we will not only elaborate on the theory of diagnosis with respect to its application in the assessment of these skills, but also discuss
the ways in which each construct might be defined and operationalized for diagnostic purposes.

Bibliographic note

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (http://www.uk.sagepub.com/aboutus/openaccess.htm).