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  • Design for trust

    Rights statement: © ACM. 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in CHI '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3025453.3025886

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Design for trust an exploration of the challenges and opportunities of Bitcoin users

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsConference contribution

Published
Publication date6/05/2017
Host publicationCHI '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages6499-6510
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781450346559
<mark>Original language</mark>English
EventACM Conference Computer Human Interaction 2017 - Denver, United States

Conference

ConferenceACM Conference Computer Human Interaction 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period6/05/1711/05/17
Internet address

Conference

ConferenceACM Conference Computer Human Interaction 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period6/05/1711/05/17
Internet address

Abstract

Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency which has received increasing interest over the last five years. Built upon a decentralized peer to peer system, it supports transparent, fast, cost effective, and irreversible transactions, without the need for trusting third party financial institutions. We know however little about people’s motivation and experience with bitcoin currency. This paper reports on interviews with 20 bitcoin users about their experience and their trust challenges. Findings show that bitcoins are used more as commodities for speculative investment or savings’ protection. The paper advances the HCI theories on trust by identifying main bitcoin characteristics and their impact on trust, such as decentralization, unregulation, embedded expertise, and reputation, as well as transactions’ transparency, low cost, and easiness to complete. We also discuss the issue of insecure transactions and the associated risks, in particular the one of dishonest traders and its mitigating strategies. The paper concludes with three design implications including support for the transparency of two-way transactions, tools for materializing trust, and tools for supporting reversible transactions.

Bibliographic note

© ACM. 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in CHI '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3025453.3025886