Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > The Role of African Fiction in Educating about ...

Electronic data

  • African_fiction_albinism_and_human_rights_final

    Rights statement: © Liverpool University Press 2017

    Accepted author manuscript, 100 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

The Role of African Fiction in Educating about Albinism and Human Rights: Jenny Robson’s Because Pula Means Rain (1998) and Ben Hanson’s Takadini (1997).

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/08/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies
Issue number3
Volume11
Number of pages14
Pages (from-to)271-284
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

As well as the practical problems associated with living with albinism in sub-Saharan Africa, many people face stigmatization and ostracism because of the beliefs and misconceptions surrounding this genetic condition. The interest here is in how fiction contributes to understandings and raises awareness of the human rights of people with albinism in Africa. Jenny Robson’s Because Pula Means Rain (1998) and Ben Hanson’s Takadini (1997) are aimed at a young adult readership and explore the impact of albinism and their protagonists’ struggle to define an identity for themselves. The article contends that fiction has an important role to play in highlighting the multidimensionality of albinism, and related associations and organizations are beginning to recognize its importance in their advocacy for human rights. The novels discussed belong to a growing body of African literature that explicitly sets out to educate about a range of contemporary social issues.

Bibliographic note

© Liverpool University Press 2017