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A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales

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A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales. / Heathwaite, L.; Sharpley, A.; Gburek, W.

In: Journal of Environmental Quality, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2000, p. 158-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Heathwaite, L, Sharpley, A & Gburek, W 2000, 'A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales', Journal of Environmental Quality, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 158-166.

APA

Heathwaite, L., Sharpley, A., & Gburek, W. (2000). A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales. Journal of Environmental Quality, 29(1), 158-166.

Vancouver

Heathwaite L, Sharpley A, Gburek W. A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales. Journal of Environmental Quality. 2000;29(1):158-166.

Author

Heathwaite, L. ; Sharpley, A. ; Gburek, W. / A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales. In: Journal of Environmental Quality. 2000 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 158-166.

Bibtex

@article{0e930b09267046328dc104b6e42e2364,
title = "A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales",
abstract = "Since the late 1960s, point-sources of water pollution have been reduced due to their ease of identification and treatment. As water quality problems remain and further point-source measures become less cost-effective, attention is directed toward reducing agricultural nonpoint-sources of P and N. In the past, separate strategies for P and N were developed and implemented at farm or watershed scales. Because of differing biology, chemistry, and flow pathways of P and N in soil, these narrowly targeted strategies may lead to mixed results. In some cases, N management of manures has increased soil P and subsequent P enrichment of surface runoff, while no-till has reduced P losses but increased nitrate leaching. Thus, an integrated approach to nutrient management is needed, with best management practices (BMPs) targeted to critical areas of a watershed that contribute most of the P and N exported. We have developed indices that identify critical sources and transport pathways controlling P and N export. These indices are applied to a mixed land use watershed in Pennsylvania. Areas most vulnerable to P loss are limited to small, well-defined areas of the watershed (<20{\%} of area) near the stream channel. In contrast to P, larger areas contribute to nitrate leaching and generally occur on the upper boundaries of the watershed (60{\%}), where freely draining soils and high manure and fertilizer N applications are made. Thus, differing levels of nutrient management may be appropriate for different areas of a watershed.",
author = "L. Heathwaite and A. Sharpley and W. Gburek",
note = "A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales 97 cites: http://scholar.google.com/scholar?num=100&hl=en&lr=&cites=3342830678259062098",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "158--166",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Quality",
issn = "0047-2425",
publisher = "ASA/CSSA/SSSA",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales

AU - Heathwaite, L.

AU - Sharpley, A.

AU - Gburek, W.

N1 - A conceptual approach for integrating phosphorus and nitrogen management at watershed scales 97 cites: http://scholar.google.com/scholar?num=100&hl=en&lr=&cites=3342830678259062098

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Since the late 1960s, point-sources of water pollution have been reduced due to their ease of identification and treatment. As water quality problems remain and further point-source measures become less cost-effective, attention is directed toward reducing agricultural nonpoint-sources of P and N. In the past, separate strategies for P and N were developed and implemented at farm or watershed scales. Because of differing biology, chemistry, and flow pathways of P and N in soil, these narrowly targeted strategies may lead to mixed results. In some cases, N management of manures has increased soil P and subsequent P enrichment of surface runoff, while no-till has reduced P losses but increased nitrate leaching. Thus, an integrated approach to nutrient management is needed, with best management practices (BMPs) targeted to critical areas of a watershed that contribute most of the P and N exported. We have developed indices that identify critical sources and transport pathways controlling P and N export. These indices are applied to a mixed land use watershed in Pennsylvania. Areas most vulnerable to P loss are limited to small, well-defined areas of the watershed (<20% of area) near the stream channel. In contrast to P, larger areas contribute to nitrate leaching and generally occur on the upper boundaries of the watershed (60%), where freely draining soils and high manure and fertilizer N applications are made. Thus, differing levels of nutrient management may be appropriate for different areas of a watershed.

AB - Since the late 1960s, point-sources of water pollution have been reduced due to their ease of identification and treatment. As water quality problems remain and further point-source measures become less cost-effective, attention is directed toward reducing agricultural nonpoint-sources of P and N. In the past, separate strategies for P and N were developed and implemented at farm or watershed scales. Because of differing biology, chemistry, and flow pathways of P and N in soil, these narrowly targeted strategies may lead to mixed results. In some cases, N management of manures has increased soil P and subsequent P enrichment of surface runoff, while no-till has reduced P losses but increased nitrate leaching. Thus, an integrated approach to nutrient management is needed, with best management practices (BMPs) targeted to critical areas of a watershed that contribute most of the P and N exported. We have developed indices that identify critical sources and transport pathways controlling P and N export. These indices are applied to a mixed land use watershed in Pennsylvania. Areas most vulnerable to P loss are limited to small, well-defined areas of the watershed (<20% of area) near the stream channel. In contrast to P, larger areas contribute to nitrate leaching and generally occur on the upper boundaries of the watershed (60%), where freely draining soils and high manure and fertilizer N applications are made. Thus, differing levels of nutrient management may be appropriate for different areas of a watershed.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 158

EP - 166

JO - Journal of Environmental Quality

JF - Journal of Environmental Quality

SN - 0047-2425

IS - 1

ER -