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  • Cross Culture Meta-Analysis Leader Emotional Intelligence Follower Performance OCB 2018 for PURE

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of World Business. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of World Business, 53, (4), 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jwb.2018.01.003

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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A Cross-Cultural Meta-Analysis of How Leader Emotional Intelligence Influences Subordinate Task Performance and Organizational Citizenship Behavior

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>06/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of World Business
Issue number4
Volume53
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)463-474
Publication statusPublished
Early online date26/02/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Global human resource managers need to understand which personality characteristics contribute to leadership effectiveness in different cultures for both selection and training purposes. This meta-analysis demonstrates that leaders’ emotional intelligence (EI) demonstrates incremental validity and relative weight in predicting subordinates’ task performance and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) after controlling for the Big Five and cognitive ability. The relationship between leaders’ EI and subordinates’ task performance is stronger in collectivistic, feminine, and high uncertainty avoidance cultures. The relationship between leaders’ EI and subordinates’ OCB is stronger in high power distance, collectivistic, feminine, high uncertainty avoidance, long-term oriented, and restraint cultures.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of World Business. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of World Business, 53, (4), 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jwb.2018.01.003