Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum ...
View graph of relations

A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum problems and cognitive biases in adolescent children of bipolar parents

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum problems and cognitive biases in adolescent children of bipolar parents. / Espie, Jonathan; Jones, Steven; Vance, Yvonne; Tai, Sara.

In: Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 35, No. 3, 06.2012, p. 769-772.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Espie, Jonathan ; Jones, Steven ; Vance, Yvonne ; Tai, Sara. / A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum problems and cognitive biases in adolescent children of bipolar parents. In: Journal of Adolescence. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 769-772.

Bibtex

@article{65a82470d71446e39f0211e9998befaf,
title = "A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum problems and cognitive biases in adolescent children of bipolar parents",
abstract = "Children of parents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk of bipolar spectrum diagnoses. This cross-sectional study explores cognitive factors in the prediction of vulnerability to bipolar disorder. Adolescents at high-risk (with a parent with bipolar disorder; n = 23) and age and gender matched adolescents (n = 24) were recruited. Parent and adolescent diagnoses were evaluated (SCID and SADS-L). Adolescents completed self-report measures assessing attributional style (ASQ), appraisal of hypomania-relevant experiences (HIQ), and hypomanic personality/temperament (HPS). Despite limitations in the power of the study, significantly more adolescents at high-risk for disorder received bipolar spectrum diagnoses. Groups did not differ in attributional style, hypomanic temperament or appraisals of hypomania-relevant experiences. A trend in ASQ results and general implications are discussed. The current study suggests that familial risk of bipolar disorder is not inevitably associated with cognitive biases in adolescence.",
keywords = "Bipolar, Adolescence , Family , High-risk , Attribution , Cognitive",
author = "Jonathan Espie and Steven Jones and Yvonne Vance and Sara Tai",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.adolescence.2011.11.002",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "769--772",
journal = "Journal of Adolescence",
issn = "0140-1971",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A family risk study exploring bipolar spectrum problems and cognitive biases in adolescent children of bipolar parents

AU - Espie, Jonathan

AU - Jones, Steven

AU - Vance, Yvonne

AU - Tai, Sara

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Children of parents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk of bipolar spectrum diagnoses. This cross-sectional study explores cognitive factors in the prediction of vulnerability to bipolar disorder. Adolescents at high-risk (with a parent with bipolar disorder; n = 23) and age and gender matched adolescents (n = 24) were recruited. Parent and adolescent diagnoses were evaluated (SCID and SADS-L). Adolescents completed self-report measures assessing attributional style (ASQ), appraisal of hypomania-relevant experiences (HIQ), and hypomanic personality/temperament (HPS). Despite limitations in the power of the study, significantly more adolescents at high-risk for disorder received bipolar spectrum diagnoses. Groups did not differ in attributional style, hypomanic temperament or appraisals of hypomania-relevant experiences. A trend in ASQ results and general implications are discussed. The current study suggests that familial risk of bipolar disorder is not inevitably associated with cognitive biases in adolescence.

AB - Children of parents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk of bipolar spectrum diagnoses. This cross-sectional study explores cognitive factors in the prediction of vulnerability to bipolar disorder. Adolescents at high-risk (with a parent with bipolar disorder; n = 23) and age and gender matched adolescents (n = 24) were recruited. Parent and adolescent diagnoses were evaluated (SCID and SADS-L). Adolescents completed self-report measures assessing attributional style (ASQ), appraisal of hypomania-relevant experiences (HIQ), and hypomanic personality/temperament (HPS). Despite limitations in the power of the study, significantly more adolescents at high-risk for disorder received bipolar spectrum diagnoses. Groups did not differ in attributional style, hypomanic temperament or appraisals of hypomania-relevant experiences. A trend in ASQ results and general implications are discussed. The current study suggests that familial risk of bipolar disorder is not inevitably associated with cognitive biases in adolescence.

KW - Bipolar

KW - Adolescence

KW - Family

KW - High-risk

KW - Attribution

KW - Cognitive

U2 - 10.1016/j.adolescence.2011.11.002

DO - 10.1016/j.adolescence.2011.11.002

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 769

EP - 772

JO - Journal of Adolescence

JF - Journal of Adolescence

SN - 0140-1971

IS - 3

ER -