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A globally-applied component model for programmable networking

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsConference contribution

Published

Publication date2003
Host publicationActive Networks
EditorsNaoki Wakamiya, Marcin Solarski, James Sterbenz
Place of publicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages202-214
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)3-540-21250-7
Original languageEnglish

Conference

Conference5th International Working Conference on Active Networks
CityKyoto
Period10/12/0312/12/03

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer
Volume2982
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference5th International Working Conference on Active Networks
CityKyoto
Period10/12/0312/12/03

Abstract

We argue that currently developed software frameworks for active and programmable networking do not provide a truly generic approach to the development, deployment, and management of services. Furthermore, current systems are typically targeted at a particular level of the programmable networking design space (e.g. at low-level, in-band, packet forwarding; or at high-level signaling) and/or at a particular hardware platform. In addition, most existing approaches, while they may address the initial configuration of systems, neglect dynamic reconfiguration of running systems. In this paper we present a reflective component-based approach that addresses these limitations. We show how our approach is applicable at all system levels, can be applied in heterogeneous hardware environments (specifically, commodity PC-based routers and network processor-based routers), and supports both initial configuration and dynamic reconfiguration. We especially address the latter point; we show the viability of our approach in (re)configuring services on an Intel IXP1200 network processor-based router.