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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology 27, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.sste.2018.09.002

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    Embargo ends: 13/10/19

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A spatial analysis of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis in relation to public water supply distribution in North West England

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology
Volume27
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)61-70
Publication statusPublished
Early online date13/10/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Giardia and Cryptosporidium are both waterborne parasites and leading causes of gastroenteritis. Although specimens from diarrhoeic patients are routinely examined for Cryptosporidium, they are often not examined for Giardia so many cases go undiagnosed. Since 2002, all faecal specimens in Central Lancashire have been tested for infection with Giardia and Cryptosporidium. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the factors contributing to giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis, including evidence of transmission via drinking water. Our analysis found a higher risk of both conditions for young children and a second peak in risk of giardiasis in adults. There was a significantly higher risk of giardiasis for males and a higher risk of cryptosporidiosis for females. The geographical location was significant, with an increased risk in the north. Residence in an area with increased supply from one water treatment works was a significant predictor for cryptosporidiosis. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology 27, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.sste.2018.09.002