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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Health & Place. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Health & Place, 63, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102353

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A ‘strategy of resistance’? How can a place-based empowerment programme influence local media portrayals of neighbourhoods and what are the implications for tackling health inequalities?

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Article number102353
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>31/05/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Health and Place
Volume63
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished
Early online date30/05/20
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Place-based stigma is linked with health and social harms, but few studies have assessed what actions may reduce these. Area-based programmes are one potential strategy but may exacerbate stigma by targeting disadvantaged neighbourhoods. We reviewed newspaper coverage in two stigmatised neighbourhoods to identify whether a programme funded in these localities influenced reporting. While both areas were dominated by negative coverage, the progamme provided an impetus for some positive stories over time and enabled community activists to articulate alternative narratives about where they lived, countering negative external portrayals. The involvement of residents should be central to strategies to tackle place-based stigma.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Health & Place. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Health & Place, 63, 2020 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102353