Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Access to Land

Associated organisational unit

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Access to Land: Social Class, Activism and the Genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Access to Land : Social Class, Activism and the Genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act. / Mayfield, Benjamin.

In: Statute Law Review, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2010, p. 63-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{44528cf6887949c3a5e164c2a86680bc,
title = "Access to Land: Social Class, Activism and the Genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act",
abstract = "This paper investigates the genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. The paper places the legislation within a broader, historical context and examines the social and legislative changes which prepared the way for a ‘right to roam’. The article also analyses the effect of civil disobedience and pressure group politics, questioning whether the new right of access is a victory for the access lobby, a compromise between conflicting interests or the product of an emerging political consensus.",
author = "Benjamin Mayfield",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1093/slr/hmq005",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "63--83",
journal = "Statute Law Review",
issn = "0144-3593",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Access to Land

T2 - Social Class, Activism and the Genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act

AU - Mayfield, Benjamin

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - This paper investigates the genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. The paper places the legislation within a broader, historical context and examines the social and legislative changes which prepared the way for a ‘right to roam’. The article also analyses the effect of civil disobedience and pressure group politics, questioning whether the new right of access is a victory for the access lobby, a compromise between conflicting interests or the product of an emerging political consensus.

AB - This paper investigates the genealogy of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. The paper places the legislation within a broader, historical context and examines the social and legislative changes which prepared the way for a ‘right to roam’. The article also analyses the effect of civil disobedience and pressure group politics, questioning whether the new right of access is a victory for the access lobby, a compromise between conflicting interests or the product of an emerging political consensus.

U2 - 10.1093/slr/hmq005

DO - 10.1093/slr/hmq005

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 63

EP - 83

JO - Statute Law Review

JF - Statute Law Review

SN - 0144-3593

IS - 1

ER -