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Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation

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Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation. / Withers, Paul J. A.; Doody, Donnacha G.; Sylvester-Bradley, Roger.

In: Sustainability, Vol. 10, No. 6, 1804, 30.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Withers, PJA, Doody, DG & Sylvester-Bradley, R 2018, 'Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation', Sustainability, vol. 10, no. 6, 1804. https://doi.org/10.3390/su10061804

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Vancouver

Author

Withers, Paul J. A. ; Doody, Donnacha G. ; Sylvester-Bradley, Roger. / Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation. In: Sustainability. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 6.

Bibtex

@article{f7d31f36e4434de59ee121d2f7223f8f,
title = "Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation",
abstract = "The notion of a phosphorus (P) circular economy provides the philosophy, framework, and opportunity to enable food production systems to become more efficient, sustainable, and resilient to a future P scarcity or sudden price shock. Whilst P recovery and recycling are central strategies for closing the P cycle, additional gains in environmental performance of food systems can be obtained by further minimising the amounts of P (a) introduced into the food system by lowering system P demand and (b) lost from the system by utilising legacy P stores in the landscape. This minimisation is an important cascading component of circularisation because it reduces the amounts of P circulating in the system, the amounts of P required to be recycled/recovered and the storage of unused P in the landscape, whilst maintaining agricultural output. The potential for circularisation and minimisation depends on regional differences in these P flow dynamics. We consider incremental and transformative management interventions towards P minimisation within circular economies, and how these might be tempered by the need to deliver a range of ecosystem services. These interventions move away from current production philosophies based on risk-averse, insurance-based farming, and current consumption patterns which have little regard for their environmental impact. We argue that a greater focus on P minimisation and circularisation should catalyse different actors and sectors in the food chain to embrace P sustainability and should empower future research needs to provide the confidence for them to do so without sacrificing future regional food security.",
keywords = "phosphorus, food system, circular economy, circularisation, minimisation, efficiency, resilience, sustainability",
author = "Withers, {Paul J. A.} and Doody, {Donnacha G.} and Roger Sylvester-Bradley",
year = "2018",
month = may
day = "30",
doi = "10.3390/su10061804",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Sustainability",
issn = "2071-1050",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Achieving Sustainable Phosphorus Use in Food Systems through Circularisation

AU - Withers, Paul J. A.

AU - Doody, Donnacha G.

AU - Sylvester-Bradley, Roger

PY - 2018/5/30

Y1 - 2018/5/30

N2 - The notion of a phosphorus (P) circular economy provides the philosophy, framework, and opportunity to enable food production systems to become more efficient, sustainable, and resilient to a future P scarcity or sudden price shock. Whilst P recovery and recycling are central strategies for closing the P cycle, additional gains in environmental performance of food systems can be obtained by further minimising the amounts of P (a) introduced into the food system by lowering system P demand and (b) lost from the system by utilising legacy P stores in the landscape. This minimisation is an important cascading component of circularisation because it reduces the amounts of P circulating in the system, the amounts of P required to be recycled/recovered and the storage of unused P in the landscape, whilst maintaining agricultural output. The potential for circularisation and minimisation depends on regional differences in these P flow dynamics. We consider incremental and transformative management interventions towards P minimisation within circular economies, and how these might be tempered by the need to deliver a range of ecosystem services. These interventions move away from current production philosophies based on risk-averse, insurance-based farming, and current consumption patterns which have little regard for their environmental impact. We argue that a greater focus on P minimisation and circularisation should catalyse different actors and sectors in the food chain to embrace P sustainability and should empower future research needs to provide the confidence for them to do so without sacrificing future regional food security.

AB - The notion of a phosphorus (P) circular economy provides the philosophy, framework, and opportunity to enable food production systems to become more efficient, sustainable, and resilient to a future P scarcity or sudden price shock. Whilst P recovery and recycling are central strategies for closing the P cycle, additional gains in environmental performance of food systems can be obtained by further minimising the amounts of P (a) introduced into the food system by lowering system P demand and (b) lost from the system by utilising legacy P stores in the landscape. This minimisation is an important cascading component of circularisation because it reduces the amounts of P circulating in the system, the amounts of P required to be recycled/recovered and the storage of unused P in the landscape, whilst maintaining agricultural output. The potential for circularisation and minimisation depends on regional differences in these P flow dynamics. We consider incremental and transformative management interventions towards P minimisation within circular economies, and how these might be tempered by the need to deliver a range of ecosystem services. These interventions move away from current production philosophies based on risk-averse, insurance-based farming, and current consumption patterns which have little regard for their environmental impact. We argue that a greater focus on P minimisation and circularisation should catalyse different actors and sectors in the food chain to embrace P sustainability and should empower future research needs to provide the confidence for them to do so without sacrificing future regional food security.

KW - phosphorus

KW - food system

KW - circular economy

KW - circularisation

KW - minimisation

KW - efficiency

KW - resilience

KW - sustainability

U2 - 10.3390/su10061804

DO - 10.3390/su10061804

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

JO - Sustainability

JF - Sustainability

SN - 2071-1050

IS - 6

M1 - 1804

ER -