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An agnostic view of 'faith hate' crime

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An agnostic view of 'faith hate' crime. / Iganski, Paul.

In: Safer Communities, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2009, p. 51-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Iganski, Paul. / An agnostic view of 'faith hate' crime. In: Safer Communities. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 51-59.

Bibtex

@article{9daa3fd479e641e198dde3104e4776a9,
title = "An agnostic view of 'faith hate' crime",
abstract = "So-called 'faith hate', or religiously aggravated crime stands out starkly as being the unchartered territory in hate crime scholarship and policy research. When the evidence about the problem in the United Kingdom is unfolded, it suggests that there may be valuable policy learning to be gained. There are some fundamental questions that need to be addressed, however. Are victims really targeted because of their faith or because of something else? Are such crimes different to other acts of hate crime, such as racist crime? And who are the perpetrators of 'faith hate' crime? Are they any different from those who commit race hate crime? These questions have important implications for policy and practice learning.",
keywords = "Faith hate, Inter-Christian sectarianism , Jewish people , Muslim people , Religiously aggravated crime",
author = "Paul Iganski",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1108/17578043200900038",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "51--59",
journal = "Safer Communities",
issn = "1757-8043",
publisher = "Pier Professional Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - An agnostic view of 'faith hate' crime

AU - Iganski, Paul

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - So-called 'faith hate', or religiously aggravated crime stands out starkly as being the unchartered territory in hate crime scholarship and policy research. When the evidence about the problem in the United Kingdom is unfolded, it suggests that there may be valuable policy learning to be gained. There are some fundamental questions that need to be addressed, however. Are victims really targeted because of their faith or because of something else? Are such crimes different to other acts of hate crime, such as racist crime? And who are the perpetrators of 'faith hate' crime? Are they any different from those who commit race hate crime? These questions have important implications for policy and practice learning.

AB - So-called 'faith hate', or religiously aggravated crime stands out starkly as being the unchartered territory in hate crime scholarship and policy research. When the evidence about the problem in the United Kingdom is unfolded, it suggests that there may be valuable policy learning to be gained. There are some fundamental questions that need to be addressed, however. Are victims really targeted because of their faith or because of something else? Are such crimes different to other acts of hate crime, such as racist crime? And who are the perpetrators of 'faith hate' crime? Are they any different from those who commit race hate crime? These questions have important implications for policy and practice learning.

KW - Faith hate

KW - Inter-Christian sectarianism

KW - Jewish people

KW - Muslim people

KW - Religiously aggravated crime

U2 - 10.1108/17578043200900038

DO - 10.1108/17578043200900038

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 51

EP - 59

JO - Safer Communities

JF - Safer Communities

SN - 1757-8043

IS - 4

ER -