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  • IJOLC-Sealey-v2-final-APA

    Rights statement: This article has been accepted for publication in International Journal of Language and Culture, Volume 5, Issue 2, 2018, pages: 224–247, © 2018 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism. / Sealey, Alison Jean.

In: International Journal of Language and Culture, Vol. 5, No. 2, 28.06.2018, p. 224–247.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Sealey, AJ 2018, 'Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism', International Journal of Language and Culture, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 224–247. https://doi.org/10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea

APA

Sealey, A. J. (2018). Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism. International Journal of Language and Culture, 5(2), 224–247. https://doi.org/10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea

Vancouver

Sealey AJ. Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism. International Journal of Language and Culture. 2018 Jun 28;5(2):224–247. https://doi.org/10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea

Author

Sealey, Alison Jean. / Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism. In: International Journal of Language and Culture. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 224–247.

Bibtex

@article{04491c5e958a43e08cccb7ffd65b3d42,
title = "Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism",
abstract = "This paper explores various ways in which contemporary British English depicts degrees of animacy among nonhuman animals, and demonstrates the anthropocentric qualities of much discourse about animals. The first section reviews discussions of animacy in relevant research literature, highlighting how these often take for granted a categorical distinction between humans and other animals, before demonstrating how both corpus-assisted approaches to discourse analysis and developments in the analysis of animacy point to a more complex picture. The second section discusses the implications of recent work in social theory for understanding organisms, and their degrees of animacy, from the perspective of networks rather than hierarchies. The third section of the paper presents analyses of an electronically stored corpus of language about animals. Three analyses of naming terms, descriptors and verbal patterns associated with various non-human animals illustrate a range of ways in which their animacy is denoted and connoted. They also demonstrate the influence of discourse type and human purpose on depictions of animals and assumptions about their animacy.",
keywords = "animacy, animals, anthropocentrism, corpus assisted discourse analysis",
author = "Sealey, {Alison Jean}",
note = "This article has been accepted for publication in International Journal of Language and Culture, Volume 5, Issue 2, 2018, pages: 224–247, {\circledC} 2018 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "224–247",
journal = "International Journal of Language and Culture",
issn = "2214-3157",
publisher = "John Benjamins Publishing Company",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Animals, animacy and anthropocentrism

AU - Sealey, Alison Jean

N1 - This article has been accepted for publication in International Journal of Language and Culture, Volume 5, Issue 2, 2018, pages: 224–247, © 2018 John Benjamins, the publisher should be contacted for permission to re-use the material in any form.

PY - 2018/6/28

Y1 - 2018/6/28

N2 - This paper explores various ways in which contemporary British English depicts degrees of animacy among nonhuman animals, and demonstrates the anthropocentric qualities of much discourse about animals. The first section reviews discussions of animacy in relevant research literature, highlighting how these often take for granted a categorical distinction between humans and other animals, before demonstrating how both corpus-assisted approaches to discourse analysis and developments in the analysis of animacy point to a more complex picture. The second section discusses the implications of recent work in social theory for understanding organisms, and their degrees of animacy, from the perspective of networks rather than hierarchies. The third section of the paper presents analyses of an electronically stored corpus of language about animals. Three analyses of naming terms, descriptors and verbal patterns associated with various non-human animals illustrate a range of ways in which their animacy is denoted and connoted. They also demonstrate the influence of discourse type and human purpose on depictions of animals and assumptions about their animacy.

AB - This paper explores various ways in which contemporary British English depicts degrees of animacy among nonhuman animals, and demonstrates the anthropocentric qualities of much discourse about animals. The first section reviews discussions of animacy in relevant research literature, highlighting how these often take for granted a categorical distinction between humans and other animals, before demonstrating how both corpus-assisted approaches to discourse analysis and developments in the analysis of animacy point to a more complex picture. The second section discusses the implications of recent work in social theory for understanding organisms, and their degrees of animacy, from the perspective of networks rather than hierarchies. The third section of the paper presents analyses of an electronically stored corpus of language about animals. Three analyses of naming terms, descriptors and verbal patterns associated with various non-human animals illustrate a range of ways in which their animacy is denoted and connoted. They also demonstrate the influence of discourse type and human purpose on depictions of animals and assumptions about their animacy.

KW - animacy

KW - animals

KW - anthropocentrism

KW - corpus assisted discourse analysis

U2 - 10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea

DO - 10.1075/ijolc.00008.sea

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

SP - 224

EP - 247

JO - International Journal of Language and Culture

JF - International Journal of Language and Culture

SN - 2214-3157

IS - 2

ER -