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Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability

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Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability. / Brough, Alison L.; Bennett, Jonathan; Morgan, Bruno; Black, Sue; Rutty, Guy N.

In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, Vol. 58, No. 4, 2013, p. 946-951.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Brough, AL, Bennett, J, Morgan, B, Black, S & Rutty, GN 2013, 'Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability', Journal of Forensic Sciences, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 946-951. https://doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.12126

APA

Brough, A. L., Bennett, J., Morgan, B., Black, S., & Rutty, G. N. (2013). Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 58(4), 946-951. https://doi.org/10.1111/1556-4029.12126

Vancouver

Author

Brough, Alison L. ; Bennett, Jonathan ; Morgan, Bruno ; Black, Sue ; Rutty, Guy N. / Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability. In: Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 58, No. 4. pp. 946-951.

Bibtex

@article{319e5937861449568e2b9f9039f79a9d,
title = "Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability",
abstract = "Currently, there is no standardized protocol for multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) measurement of juvenile remains. Using 33 juvenile clavicles, this paper investigates a protocol to allow MDCT measurements, comparable or supplemental with traditional osteometric measurements, to be acquired for application to previously published algorithms. The results illustrate that there is no significant difference between MDCT measurements and those taken by direct osteometric methods. By presenting such a protocol, this paper takes the first steps toward validation of the process of conversion from measurement of dry juvenile bone to MDCT compatibility and allows the forensic world to take a step forward in standardizing the way MDCT is used for forensic practice. This paper assesses the limitations and potential applications of this virtual approach and offers some suggestions for where further work might progress the conversion of these new approaches into legally admissible anthropological techniques of age estimation.",
keywords = "forensic science, forensic anthropology, multi-detector computed-tomograpy, virtual, juvenile, clavicle",
author = "Brough, {Alison L.} and Jonathan Bennett and Bruno Morgan and Sue Black and Rutty, {Guy N.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/1556-4029.12126",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "946--951",
journal = "Journal of Forensic Sciences",
issn = "0022-1198",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anthropological measurement of the juvenile clavicle using multi-detector computed tomography-affirming reliability

AU - Brough, Alison L.

AU - Bennett, Jonathan

AU - Morgan, Bruno

AU - Black, Sue

AU - Rutty, Guy N.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Currently, there is no standardized protocol for multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) measurement of juvenile remains. Using 33 juvenile clavicles, this paper investigates a protocol to allow MDCT measurements, comparable or supplemental with traditional osteometric measurements, to be acquired for application to previously published algorithms. The results illustrate that there is no significant difference between MDCT measurements and those taken by direct osteometric methods. By presenting such a protocol, this paper takes the first steps toward validation of the process of conversion from measurement of dry juvenile bone to MDCT compatibility and allows the forensic world to take a step forward in standardizing the way MDCT is used for forensic practice. This paper assesses the limitations and potential applications of this virtual approach and offers some suggestions for where further work might progress the conversion of these new approaches into legally admissible anthropological techniques of age estimation.

AB - Currently, there is no standardized protocol for multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) measurement of juvenile remains. Using 33 juvenile clavicles, this paper investigates a protocol to allow MDCT measurements, comparable or supplemental with traditional osteometric measurements, to be acquired for application to previously published algorithms. The results illustrate that there is no significant difference between MDCT measurements and those taken by direct osteometric methods. By presenting such a protocol, this paper takes the first steps toward validation of the process of conversion from measurement of dry juvenile bone to MDCT compatibility and allows the forensic world to take a step forward in standardizing the way MDCT is used for forensic practice. This paper assesses the limitations and potential applications of this virtual approach and offers some suggestions for where further work might progress the conversion of these new approaches into legally admissible anthropological techniques of age estimation.

KW - forensic science

KW - forensic anthropology

KW - multi-detector computed-tomograpy

KW - virtual

KW - juvenile

KW - clavicle

U2 - 10.1111/1556-4029.12126

DO - 10.1111/1556-4029.12126

M3 - Journal article

VL - 58

SP - 946

EP - 951

JO - Journal of Forensic Sciences

JF - Journal of Forensic Sciences

SN - 0022-1198

IS - 4

ER -