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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 89, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.02.008

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Are sleep disturbances causally linked to the presence and severity of psychotic-like, dissociative and hypomanic experiences in non-clinical populations?: A Systematic Review

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>06/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume89
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)119-131
Publication statusPublished
Early online date13/02/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The present review aimed to 1) identify what sleep disturbances co-occur alongside psychotic-like, dissociative and hypomanic experiences; 2) assess the strength of potential associations between the severity of sleep disturbances and of the experiences studied; and 3) appraise evidence for a causal link. MedLine and PsycInfo were searched and 44 studies were deemed eligible. Results showed that insomnia was associated with all individual psychotic-like, dissociative and hypomanic experiences reviewed (effect size range: small-to-large). Parasomnias were associated with all psychotic-like experiences; however, there was evidence of variation in magnitude between individual experiences. An eveningness chronotype was associated with dissociative and hypomanic experiences, and circadian dysrhythmia was found alongside hypomania but not the other experiences reviewed. Finally, experimental sleep manipulation studies revealed a potential causal link between sleep loss and psychotic-like and dissociative experiences with a large effect size. However, this was not the case for experiences such as paranoia. Future research, using experimental manipulations of sleep to address putative mechanisms, will enable questions of causality to be answered with more confidence.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 89, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.02.008