Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Asteroid impact effects and their immediate haz...

Electronic data

  • Rumpf_Immediate_Environmental_Consequences_accepted (003)

    Rights statement: An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. It is recommended that the full citation and a link to the open abstract also be provided: Rumpf, C. M., H. G. Lewis, and P. M. Atkinson (2017), Asteroid impact effects and their immediate hazards for human populations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3433–3440, doi: 10.1002/2017GL073191. To view the published open abstract, go to http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2017GL073191

    Accepted author manuscript, 1016 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

  • Rumpf_et_al-2017-Geophysical_Research_Letters

    Final published version, 1 MB, PDF document

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Asteroid impact effects and their immediate hazards for human populations

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>28/04/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Geophysical Research Letters
Issue number8
Volume44
Number of pages8
Pages (from-to)3433-3440
Publication statusPublished
Early online date19/04/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

A set of 50,000 artificial Earth impacting asteroids was used to obtain, for the first time, information about the dominance of individual impact effects such as wind blast, overpressure shock, thermal radiation, cratering, seismic shaking, ejecta deposition, and tsunami for the loss of human life during an impact event for impactor sizes between 15 and 400 m and how the dominance of impact effects changes over size. Information about the dominance of each impact effect can enable disaster managers to plan for the most relevant effects in the event of an asteroid impact. Furthermore, the analysis of average casualty numbers per impactor shows that there is a significant difference in expected loss for airburst and surface impacts and that the average impact over land is an order of magnitude more dangerous than one over water.

Bibliographic note

An edited version of this paper was published by AGU. Copyright 2017 American Geophysical Union. It is recommended that the full citation and a link to the open abstract also be provided: Rumpf, C. M., H. G. Lewis, and P. M. Atkinson (2017), Asteroid impact effects and their immediate hazards for human populations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3433–3440, doi: 10.1002/2017GL073191. To view the published open abstract, go to http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2017GL073191