Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Attachment styles and clinical communication pe...

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • 1-s2.0-S0738399116302269-main

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Patient Education and Counseling. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Patient Education and Counseling, 99, 11, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019

    Accepted author manuscript, 220 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors. / Fletcher, Ian John; McCallum, Rachel Fiona; Peters, Sarah.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 99, No. 11, 11.2016, p. 1852-1857.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Fletcher, Ian John ; McCallum, Rachel Fiona ; Peters, Sarah. / Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2016 ; Vol. 99, No. 11. pp. 1852-1857.

Bibtex

@article{d1d3842ccb134c48bc4bdc3dde1398dd,
title = "Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors",
abstract = "ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between trainee doctors{\textquoteright} attachment style and their performance in qualifying clinical and communication skills assessments.MethodsParticipants were 190 undergraduate medical students whose performance was assessed by examiners across two areas (communication and clinical skills) during their qualifying Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Simulated patients also rated communication skills. Participants{\textquoteright} attachment style was rated across two dimensions, avoidance and anxiety, with the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ).ResultsLower levels of attachment avoidance and anxiety were significant predictors of higher performance in both communication and clinical skills.ConclusionTrainee doctors{\textquoteright} attachment styles are associated with patient communication and clinical performance. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of attachment on consultations between doctors and patients within clinical settings.Practice implicationAttachment theory can inform our understanding why, for some student doctors, interacting with patients may be particularly challenging and require additional support by medical educators.",
keywords = "Attachment, OSCE, doctor-patient communication, clinical skills",
author = "Fletcher, {Ian John} and McCallum, {Rachel Fiona} and Sarah Peters",
note = "This is the author{\textquoteright}s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Patient Education and Counseling. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Patient Education and Counseling, 99, 11, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "1852--1857",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors

AU - Fletcher, Ian John

AU - McCallum, Rachel Fiona

AU - Peters, Sarah

N1 - This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Patient Education and Counseling. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Patient Education and Counseling, 99, 11, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between trainee doctors’ attachment style and their performance in qualifying clinical and communication skills assessments.MethodsParticipants were 190 undergraduate medical students whose performance was assessed by examiners across two areas (communication and clinical skills) during their qualifying Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Simulated patients also rated communication skills. Participants’ attachment style was rated across two dimensions, avoidance and anxiety, with the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ).ResultsLower levels of attachment avoidance and anxiety were significant predictors of higher performance in both communication and clinical skills.ConclusionTrainee doctors’ attachment styles are associated with patient communication and clinical performance. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of attachment on consultations between doctors and patients within clinical settings.Practice implicationAttachment theory can inform our understanding why, for some student doctors, interacting with patients may be particularly challenging and require additional support by medical educators.

AB - ObjectiveTo investigate the relationship between trainee doctors’ attachment style and their performance in qualifying clinical and communication skills assessments.MethodsParticipants were 190 undergraduate medical students whose performance was assessed by examiners across two areas (communication and clinical skills) during their qualifying Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Simulated patients also rated communication skills. Participants’ attachment style was rated across two dimensions, avoidance and anxiety, with the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ).ResultsLower levels of attachment avoidance and anxiety were significant predictors of higher performance in both communication and clinical skills.ConclusionTrainee doctors’ attachment styles are associated with patient communication and clinical performance. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of attachment on consultations between doctors and patients within clinical settings.Practice implicationAttachment theory can inform our understanding why, for some student doctors, interacting with patients may be particularly challenging and require additional support by medical educators.

KW - Attachment

KW - OSCE

KW - doctor-patient communication

KW - clinical skills

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.05.019

M3 - Journal article

VL - 99

SP - 1852

EP - 1857

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 11

ER -