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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development on 30/06/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

    Accepted author manuscript, 483 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Awkward questions: language issues in the 2011 census in England

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

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Awkward questions : language issues in the 2011 census in England. / Sebba, Mark.

In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, Vol. 39, No. 2, 02.2018, p. 181-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Sebba, M 2018, 'Awkward questions: language issues in the 2011 census in England', Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 181-193. https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

APA

Sebba, M. (2018). Awkward questions: language issues in the 2011 census in England. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 39(2), 181-193. https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

Vancouver

Sebba M. Awkward questions: language issues in the 2011 census in England. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development. 2018 Feb;39(2):181-193. https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

Author

Sebba, Mark. / Awkward questions : language issues in the 2011 census in England. In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 181-193.

Bibtex

@article{ba07ab28a27d44cf8a49ae6eb346b154,
title = "Awkward questions: language issues in the 2011 census in England",
abstract = "The 2011 Census in England broke new ground, as a question about language had never previously been asked. After stakeholder consultations and a series of trials, the census authority decided on two questions based on earlier censuses in the USA: one about the respondent’s ‘main language’ and another about proficiency in English. This paper provides a critique of the census questions, showing how the pressure to produce questions which were straightforward to answer and consistent with the predominant monolingual ideology led to the choice of two questions which were problematic in different ways. This raises doubts about the validity of the questions themselves and the usefulness of the data collected.",
keywords = "Census, multilingualism, language policy, self-assessment of language proficiency",
author = "Mark Sebba",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development on 30/06/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "181--193",
journal = "Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development",
issn = "0143-4632",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Awkward questions

T2 - language issues in the 2011 census in England

AU - Sebba, Mark

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development on 30/06/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - The 2011 Census in England broke new ground, as a question about language had never previously been asked. After stakeholder consultations and a series of trials, the census authority decided on two questions based on earlier censuses in the USA: one about the respondent’s ‘main language’ and another about proficiency in English. This paper provides a critique of the census questions, showing how the pressure to produce questions which were straightforward to answer and consistent with the predominant monolingual ideology led to the choice of two questions which were problematic in different ways. This raises doubts about the validity of the questions themselves and the usefulness of the data collected.

AB - The 2011 Census in England broke new ground, as a question about language had never previously been asked. After stakeholder consultations and a series of trials, the census authority decided on two questions based on earlier censuses in the USA: one about the respondent’s ‘main language’ and another about proficiency in English. This paper provides a critique of the census questions, showing how the pressure to produce questions which were straightforward to answer and consistent with the predominant monolingual ideology led to the choice of two questions which were problematic in different ways. This raises doubts about the validity of the questions themselves and the usefulness of the data collected.

KW - Census

KW - multilingualism

KW - language policy

KW - self-assessment of language proficiency

U2 - 10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

DO - 10.1080/01434632.2017.1342651

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 181

EP - 193

JO - Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development

JF - Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development

SN - 0143-4632

IS - 2

ER -