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  • Karanika and Hogg - Being kind to ourselves -8 July 2015

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 69, 2, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.042

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Being kind to ourselves: self-compassion, coping and consumption

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>02/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Issue number2
Volume69
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)760-769
Publication statusPublished
Early online date6/08/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Most consumer research on coping builds from the notion of pursuing self-esteem. However recent psychological research emphasizes the pursuit of self-compassion as a healthier goal versus the pursuit of self-esteem within coping strategies. Only a minority of consumer research studies discuss self-compassion in relation to coping. Yet, these more recent consumer studies firstly, do not explore the different coping strategies linked to self-compassion even though psychological research suggests that self-compassion involves different components. Secondly, these recent consumer studies do not explore the role of socio-temporal comparisons in self-compassionate coping even though psychological research relates socio-temporal comparisons to self-compassion. This phenomenological study of downwardly mobile consumers identifies different coping strategies that reflect a pursuit of self-compassion and highlights how coping strategies, with a focus on self-compassion, relate to socio-temporal comparisons. The study contrasts and maps consumers’ coping strategies in their pursuit of self-esteem and self-compassion. The study contributes to understanding of consumer coping.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 69, 2, 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.042