Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Breadth of emotion vocabulary in early adolescence

Associated organisational unit

Electronic data

  • Author_version._ICP._Emotion_Vocabulary_in_Adolescence

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Imagination, Cognition and Personality, 38(4), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Imagination, Cognition and Personality page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/ica on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

    Accepted author manuscript, 977 KB, PDF document

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Breadth of emotion vocabulary in early adolescence

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/06/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Imagination, Cognition and Personality
Issue number4
Volume38
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)378-404
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date23/03/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

Studies of emotion vocabulary and understanding typically focus on early childhood. Yet, emotion abilities continue to develop into adolescence, making it an important and underinvestigated area of research. This study presents evidence that adolescents’ emotion vocabulary undergoes active development, becomes more broad and sophisticated, varies by gender, and is not captured adequately by recognition-based approaches. Adolescents were asked to generate emotion words for five emotion categories—happy, relaxed, angry, sad, and nervous. Responses included emotion words (e.g., joyous) and nonemotion terms such as metaphors (e.g., boiling), social experiences (e.g., underappreciated), and personality traits (e.g., shy). Girls generated significantly more responses than boys. Older adolescents generated significantly more emotion words (e.g., describing someone who is happy as joyful, exuberant or ecstatic), while younger adolescents produced more nonemotion responses (e.g., describing someone who is happy as smiley, friendly, or full of life). Students’ grade, total number of responses they produced, and performance on the recognition test of emotion understanding predicted their emotion vocabulary.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Imagination, Cognition and Personality, 38(4), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Imagination, Cognition and Personality page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/ica on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/