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  • Burnout within forensic psychiatric nursing: Its relationship with ward environment and effective clinical supervision

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Berry, S, Robertson, N. Burnout within forensic psychiatric nursing: Its relationship with ward environment and effective clinical supervision? J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2019; 26: 212– 222. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12538 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jpm.12538 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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Burnout within forensic psychiatric nursing: Its relationship with ward environment and effective clinical supervision?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/09/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Issue number7-8
Volume26
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)212-222
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date25/07/19
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

4.1 Introduction
Despite extensive research examining burnout in psychiatric nursing staff, literature exploring key predictors of burnout in secure psychiatric settings has been relatively neglected. Research has yet to explore burnout in these settings by adopting previously identified predictors such as support or the ward environment.

4.2 Aim
The current study aimed to reduce this gap by exploring burnout, the perceived effectiveness of clinical supervision and ward environment.

4.3 Method
In 2014, nursing staff working in a medium secure forensic psychiatric unit in the United Kingdom (N = 137) provided demographic information and completed the measures assessing: Burnout, clinical supervision and the ward environment.

4.4 Results
Approximately 10% of nursing staff could be classed as “burnt‐out”. The main predictors of burnout were age and ward environment. Clinical supervision had minimal association with burnout.

4.5 Discussion
The current study sheds doubt on clinical supervision as a potential intervention for burnout and results appear comparable to research within other settings. The implications of the ward environment, supervision and burnout are discussed herein.

4.6 Implication for Practice
Interventions may need to focus on a positive ward environment (including patient cohesion, experienced safety and enhancing the therapeutic atmosphere). Organizations should support younger nursing staff as they appear particularly vulnerable to burnout.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Berry, S, Robertson, N. Burnout within forensic psychiatric nursing: Its relationship with ward environment and effective clinical supervision? J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2019; 26: 212– 222. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12538 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jpm.12538 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.