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Celebrating advances in LGBT+ diversity in the accountancy profession: Not letting idealistic purity become the enemy of progress

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>5/11/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal
Issue number5
Volume9
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)636-641
Publication statusPublished
Early online date30/10/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Purpose:
This paper provides a commentary on evidence presented and issues raised in Egan (2018) regarding LGBT+ diversity initiatives in the accountancy profession.

Design/methodology/approach:
This paper is an invited commentary based on the author’s experiences of LGBT+ and other diversity initiatives in the profession.

Findings:
There is cause for optimism in how far the profession has progressed in some countries on supporting LGBT+ (and other forms of) diversity.

Practical implications:
As the multinational accountancy firms can be agents for change in countries where there remains considerable discrimination and hostility to LGBT+ (and other) communities, constructive critique to help further improve the firms’ innovative actions on LGBT+ and other diversity issues could have a major positive impact on social justice. Egan (2018) is an example of such constructive critique.

Social implications:
Where other academic studies take a disparagingly critical approach they risk both (1) squandering the opportunity to help achieve the progress they espouse and (2) discouraging other firms embracing innovative diversity practices.

Originality/value:
Provides a counter perspective to some Critical Accounting arguments that appear to value idealism over progress.

Bibliographic note

This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here.Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.