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Celebratory health technology

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Celebratory health technology. / Parker, A.G.; Harper, R.; Grinter, R.E.

In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2011, p. 319-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Parker, AG, Harper, R & Grinter, RE 2011, 'Celebratory health technology', Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 319-324. https://doi.org/10.1177/193229681100500218

APA

Parker, A. G., Harper, R., & Grinter, R. E. (2011). Celebratory health technology. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 5(2), 319-324. https://doi.org/10.1177/193229681100500218

Vancouver

Parker AG, Harper R, Grinter RE. Celebratory health technology. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2011;5(2):319-324. https://doi.org/10.1177/193229681100500218

Author

Parker, A.G. ; Harper, R. ; Grinter, R.E. / Celebratory health technology. In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 319-324.

Bibtex

@article{9de472691a63421ea08e0dc5aaabf138,
title = "Celebratory health technology",
abstract = "There are numerous everyday health technologies (applications designed for people to use in their daily lives) that promote healthy eating habits. From educational games to monitoring applications, these systems often take a corrective approach in that they are designed to fix the problematic aspects of people's interactions with, and thoughts about, food. We propose a complementary approach, termed celebratory health technology design, in which systems promote healthy eating by highlighting positive food interactions, meanings, and values. We present a case study from our research to show the benefit and feasibility of designing celebratory health applications. Our goal is to encourage a more comprehensive approach to everyday health technology design, one that encompasses not only corrective systems, but celebratory applications as well. {\textcopyright} Diabetes Technology Society.",
keywords = "Everyday health technology, Food, Food values, Health applications, Nutrition, attitude to health, celebratory health technology, conference paper, eating habit, feeding behavior, health disparity, health promotion, human, lowest income group, medical research, medical technology, nutrition, pilot study, sociology, wellbeing, article, decision making, food, health education, methodology, monitoring, nutritional science, Biomedical Technology, Decision Making, Food Habits, Health Education, Health Promotion, Humans, Monitoring, Physiologic, Nutritional Sciences",
author = "A.G. Parker and R. Harper and R.E. Grinter",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1177/193229681100500218",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "319--324",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology",
issn = "1932-2968",
publisher = "SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Celebratory health technology

AU - Parker, A.G.

AU - Harper, R.

AU - Grinter, R.E.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - There are numerous everyday health technologies (applications designed for people to use in their daily lives) that promote healthy eating habits. From educational games to monitoring applications, these systems often take a corrective approach in that they are designed to fix the problematic aspects of people's interactions with, and thoughts about, food. We propose a complementary approach, termed celebratory health technology design, in which systems promote healthy eating by highlighting positive food interactions, meanings, and values. We present a case study from our research to show the benefit and feasibility of designing celebratory health applications. Our goal is to encourage a more comprehensive approach to everyday health technology design, one that encompasses not only corrective systems, but celebratory applications as well. © Diabetes Technology Society.

AB - There are numerous everyday health technologies (applications designed for people to use in their daily lives) that promote healthy eating habits. From educational games to monitoring applications, these systems often take a corrective approach in that they are designed to fix the problematic aspects of people's interactions with, and thoughts about, food. We propose a complementary approach, termed celebratory health technology design, in which systems promote healthy eating by highlighting positive food interactions, meanings, and values. We present a case study from our research to show the benefit and feasibility of designing celebratory health applications. Our goal is to encourage a more comprehensive approach to everyday health technology design, one that encompasses not only corrective systems, but celebratory applications as well. © Diabetes Technology Society.

KW - Everyday health technology

KW - Food

KW - Food values

KW - Health applications

KW - Nutrition

KW - attitude to health

KW - celebratory health technology

KW - conference paper

KW - eating habit

KW - feeding behavior

KW - health disparity

KW - health promotion

KW - human

KW - lowest income group

KW - medical research

KW - medical technology

KW - nutrition

KW - pilot study

KW - sociology

KW - wellbeing

KW - article

KW - decision making

KW - food

KW - health education

KW - methodology

KW - monitoring

KW - nutritional science

KW - Biomedical Technology

KW - Decision Making

KW - Food Habits

KW - Health Education

KW - Health Promotion

KW - Humans

KW - Monitoring, Physiologic

KW - Nutritional Sciences

U2 - 10.1177/193229681100500218

DO - 10.1177/193229681100500218

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

SP - 319

EP - 324

JO - Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology

JF - Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology

SN - 1932-2968

IS - 2

ER -