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    Rights statement: ©American Psychological Association, 2020. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: https://doi.org/10.1037/law0000245

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Challenges of a "Toolbox" Approach to Investigative Interviewing: A Critical Analysis of the RCMP's Phased Interview Model

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/08/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Psychology, Public Policy and Law
Issue number3
Volume26
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)261–273
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police implemented the Phased Interview Model in Canada and has argued that it is a novel and productive way to interview suspects. We applaud the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for moving away from a purely accusatorial approach and recognize that Phased Interview Model contains several science-based practices. In this article, however, we evaluate the Phased Interview Model critically. In particular, we present compelling empirical evidence that three fundamental practices (minimizing culpability, mischaracterizing evidence, and asking leading questions) in the Phased Interview Model put the truth-seeking function of police interviews at risk. We also explore the challenges inherent in combining accusatorial and information gathering techniques into a hybrid ‘toolbox’ approach. We conclude that advocating for interview protocols that contain dangerous or untested practices may hinder the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s ability to achieve their purported goals of obtaining voluntary statements and accurate information.

Bibliographic note

©American Psychological Association, 2020. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: https://doi.org/10.1037/law0000245