Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Children working it out together

Electronic data

  • Oliver Philp Duchesne 2017 LTR Children working it out together

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in System. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in System, 69, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.system.2017.08.001

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.03 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Children working it out together: a comparison of younger and older learners collaborating in task based interaction

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>System
Volume69
Number of pages14
Pages (from-to)1-14
Publication statusPublished
Early online date9/08/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This paper describes peer interaction among children with English as an Additional Language (EAL) in primary schools. Through linguistic analysis it provides an exploratory examination of the nature of their collaborations, how they work together and the ways they interact as they complete classroom task pair work. 42 children from two junior and two senior classes of intermediate level English from four EAL reception classrooms participated. Data comprised recordings and transcriptions of the interactions of 11 pairs of younger (5–8 years) and 10 pairs of older (9–12 years) children as they completed five tasks over two weeks. An analysis of the language used demonstrated variation in: (a) the way the children worked socially, enjoyment during task work, cooperating and achieving reciprocity, and how they resolved conflict when it occurred; (b) their task management and on- and off-task talk; (c) the language they used for learning, demonstrating their cognitive involvement, and; (d) their attention to content and linguistic aspects of the task. Differences were also observed to occur according to the age of the learners. Together the results from this study suggest the need to consider task based interaction beyond simply the linguistic and operational levels alone.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in System. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in System, 69, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.system.2017.08.001