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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Criminal Justice and Behavior, 47 (1), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Criminal Justice and Behavior page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/CJB on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Communication Error Management in Law Enforcement Interactions: A Sender’s Perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Communication Error Management in Law Enforcement Interactions : A Sender’s Perspective. / Oostinga, Miriam; Giebels, Ellen; Taylor, Paul.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 39-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Oostinga, Miriam ; Giebels, Ellen ; Taylor, Paul. / Communication Error Management in Law Enforcement Interactions : A Sender’s Perspective. In: Criminal Justice and Behavior. 2020 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 39-60.

Bibtex

@article{01046a621ea244a48230c08c95bc390a,
title = "Communication Error Management in Law Enforcement Interactions: A Sender{\textquoteright}s Perspective",
abstract = "We examined the psychological and behavioral consequences of making a communication error in expressive crisis negotiations and instrumental suspect interviews. During crisis negotiation (n = 133) or suspect interview (n = 68) training, Dutch police and probation officers received preparation material that led them to make a factual, judgment, or no error. Across both studies, errors increased officers{\textquoteright} negative affect, with errors leading to more stress in crisis negotiations and more distraction in suspect interviews. When comparing factual with judgment errors, factual errors led to more distraction in crisis negotiations and more negative affect in suspect interviews. Analysis of the transcribed dialogues identified four categories of response: apologize, exploration, deflect, and no alignment. Of these, negotiators used all four regularly, whereas interviewers predominantly used exploration and deflect. Our findings revealed the potentially negative effects of errors on officers and offered insights into how they could best focus to induce an appropriate response.",
keywords = "communication errors, response strategies, error management, suspect interview, crisis negotiation",
author = "Miriam Oostinga and Ellen Giebels and Paul Taylor",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Criminal Justice and Behavior, 47 (1), 2019, {\textcopyright} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Criminal Justice and Behavior page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/CJB on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/ ",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0093854819870856",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "39--60",
journal = "Criminal Justice and Behavior",
issn = "0093-8548",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Communication Error Management in Law Enforcement Interactions

T2 - A Sender’s Perspective

AU - Oostinga, Miriam

AU - Giebels, Ellen

AU - Taylor, Paul

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Criminal Justice and Behavior, 47 (1), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Criminal Justice and Behavior page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/CJB on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - We examined the psychological and behavioral consequences of making a communication error in expressive crisis negotiations and instrumental suspect interviews. During crisis negotiation (n = 133) or suspect interview (n = 68) training, Dutch police and probation officers received preparation material that led them to make a factual, judgment, or no error. Across both studies, errors increased officers’ negative affect, with errors leading to more stress in crisis negotiations and more distraction in suspect interviews. When comparing factual with judgment errors, factual errors led to more distraction in crisis negotiations and more negative affect in suspect interviews. Analysis of the transcribed dialogues identified four categories of response: apologize, exploration, deflect, and no alignment. Of these, negotiators used all four regularly, whereas interviewers predominantly used exploration and deflect. Our findings revealed the potentially negative effects of errors on officers and offered insights into how they could best focus to induce an appropriate response.

AB - We examined the psychological and behavioral consequences of making a communication error in expressive crisis negotiations and instrumental suspect interviews. During crisis negotiation (n = 133) or suspect interview (n = 68) training, Dutch police and probation officers received preparation material that led them to make a factual, judgment, or no error. Across both studies, errors increased officers’ negative affect, with errors leading to more stress in crisis negotiations and more distraction in suspect interviews. When comparing factual with judgment errors, factual errors led to more distraction in crisis negotiations and more negative affect in suspect interviews. Analysis of the transcribed dialogues identified four categories of response: apologize, exploration, deflect, and no alignment. Of these, negotiators used all four regularly, whereas interviewers predominantly used exploration and deflect. Our findings revealed the potentially negative effects of errors on officers and offered insights into how they could best focus to induce an appropriate response.

KW - communication errors

KW - response strategies

KW - error management

KW - suspect interview

KW - crisis negotiation

U2 - 10.1177/0093854819870856

DO - 10.1177/0093854819870856

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

SP - 39

EP - 60

JO - Criminal Justice and Behavior

JF - Criminal Justice and Behavior

SN - 0093-8548

IS - 1

ER -