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  • SHE Resubmission_02 2018

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 26/03/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03075079.2018.1453793

    Accepted author manuscript, 438 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Complexities, challenges and implications of collaborative work within a regime of performance measurement: the case of management and organisation studies

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/09/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Studies in Higher Education
Issue number9
Volume44
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)1539-1553
Publication StatusPublished
Early online date26/03/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The current demands on higher education institutions (HEIs) to become more efficient and effective have led to increasing performance pressures on researchers, and consequently on the practices and outcomes of researcher collaborations. In this paper, based on a qualitative study of collaborative experiences of management and organisation studies scholars, we explore the complexities and challenges of researcher collaborations under the current regime of academic performance measurement. Our study suggests that researcher collaborations are underpinned by four main rationalities: traditional-hierarchical, strategic-instrumental, scholarly-professional and relationship-orientated. We find that strategic-instrumental rationalities are the most prevalent and typically infuse other rationalities. Our research demonstrates that there are potential adverse consequences for the quality and purpose of outputs, the effects on collegial relationships and risks of exploitation and reinvoked hierarchies in collaborative relationships. The study reveals some of the problematic implications for academics and HEIs that emerge as a consequence of research productivity measurement.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 26/03/2018, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03075079.2018.1453793