Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Constipation management in people with intellec...

Electronic data

  • Constipation Management for Pure

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Robertson J, Baines S, Emerson E, Hatton C. Constipation management in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:709–724. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12426 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12426/full This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 649 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Constipation management in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Constipation management in people with intellectual disability : A systematic review. / Robertson, Janet Margaret; Baines, Susannah May Johnston; Emerson, Eric Broughton; Hatton, Christopher Rowan.

In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 31, No. 5, 09.2018, p. 709-724.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{84ddd3b4ba3d4c74a17f323c928f43cc,
title = "Constipation management in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review",
abstract = "BackgroundConstipation can lead to serious health issues and death. This systematic review summarizes international research pertaining to the management of constipation in people with intellectual disability.MethodStudies published from 1990 to 2017 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests and cross-citations. Studies were reviewed narratively in relation to identified themes.ResultsEighteen studies were reviewed in relation to three themes: laxative receipt; interventions (dietary fibre, abdominal massage and macrogol); and staff issues (knowledge and training). Laxative polypharmacy was common. Studies report positive results for dietary fibre and abdominal massage although study quality was limited.ConclusionThe main management response to constipation in people with intellectual disability is laxative use despite limited effectiveness. An improved evidence base is required to support the suggestion that an individualized, integrated bowel management programme may reduce constipation and associated health conditions in people with intellectual disability.",
keywords = "constipation, intellectual disability, review",
author = "Robertson, {Janet Margaret} and Baines, {Susannah May Johnston} and Emerson, {Eric Broughton} and Hatton, {Christopher Rowan}",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Robertson J, Baines S, Emerson E, Hatton C. Constipation management in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:709–724. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12426 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12426/full This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/jar.12426",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "709--724",
journal = "Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1360-2322",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constipation management in people with intellectual disability

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Robertson, Janet Margaret

AU - Baines, Susannah May Johnston

AU - Emerson, Eric Broughton

AU - Hatton, Christopher Rowan

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Robertson J, Baines S, Emerson E, Hatton C. Constipation management in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:709–724. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12426 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12426/full This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - BackgroundConstipation can lead to serious health issues and death. This systematic review summarizes international research pertaining to the management of constipation in people with intellectual disability.MethodStudies published from 1990 to 2017 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests and cross-citations. Studies were reviewed narratively in relation to identified themes.ResultsEighteen studies were reviewed in relation to three themes: laxative receipt; interventions (dietary fibre, abdominal massage and macrogol); and staff issues (knowledge and training). Laxative polypharmacy was common. Studies report positive results for dietary fibre and abdominal massage although study quality was limited.ConclusionThe main management response to constipation in people with intellectual disability is laxative use despite limited effectiveness. An improved evidence base is required to support the suggestion that an individualized, integrated bowel management programme may reduce constipation and associated health conditions in people with intellectual disability.

AB - BackgroundConstipation can lead to serious health issues and death. This systematic review summarizes international research pertaining to the management of constipation in people with intellectual disability.MethodStudies published from 1990 to 2017 were identified using Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, Web of Science, email requests and cross-citations. Studies were reviewed narratively in relation to identified themes.ResultsEighteen studies were reviewed in relation to three themes: laxative receipt; interventions (dietary fibre, abdominal massage and macrogol); and staff issues (knowledge and training). Laxative polypharmacy was common. Studies report positive results for dietary fibre and abdominal massage although study quality was limited.ConclusionThe main management response to constipation in people with intellectual disability is laxative use despite limited effectiveness. An improved evidence base is required to support the suggestion that an individualized, integrated bowel management programme may reduce constipation and associated health conditions in people with intellectual disability.

KW - constipation

KW - intellectual disability

KW - review

U2 - 10.1111/jar.12426

DO - 10.1111/jar.12426

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 709

EP - 724

JO - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1360-2322

IS - 5

ER -