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  • Bahrain Paper - Comments

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Discourse on 19/01/2017 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23269995.2016.1259232

    Accepted author manuscript, 297 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Contested spaces and sectarian narratives in post: uprising Bahrain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/01/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Global Discourse
Issue number4
Volume6
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)677-696
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

In early February 2011, people took to the streets of Manama, Bahrain, protesting against the political system of the Al Khalifa monarchy. Although initially occurring along non-sectarian lines, the protests were quickly framed as such and, as a consequence, the nature of the protests changed. This article engages with this process of sectarianism, exploring how space became contested and how such sites took on political – and sectarian – meanings. In the article, we argue that by framing the protests in such a way, the Al Khalifa regime was able to create a master narrative that impacted upon all facets of Bahraini society, at home and abroad.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Discourse on 19/01/2017 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23269995.2016.1259232