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  • Bahrain Paper - Comments

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Discourse on 19/01/2017 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23269995.2016.1259232

    Accepted author manuscript, 297 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Contested spaces and sectarian narratives in post: uprising Bahrain

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/01/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Global Discourse
Issue number4
Volume6
Number of pages20
Pages (from-to)677-696
Publication StatusPublished
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

In early February 2011, people took to the streets of Manama, Bahrain, protesting against the political system of the Al Khalifa monarchy. Although initially occurring along non-sectarian lines, the protests were quickly framed as such and, as a consequence, the nature of the protests changed. This article engages with this process of sectarianism, exploring how space became contested and how such sites took on political – and sectarian – meanings. In the article, we argue that by framing the protests in such a way, the Al Khalifa regime was able to create a master narrative that impacted upon all facets of Bahraini society, at home and abroad.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Global Discourse on 19/01/2017 available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23269995.2016.1259232