Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Coral reefs as novel ecosystems

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Coral reefs as novel ecosystems: embracing new futures

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>04/2014
<mark>Journal</mark>Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Volume7
Number of pages6
Pages (from-to)9-14
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The composition and functions of many ecosystems are changing, giving rise to the concept of novel ecosystems. Although some coral reefs are becoming non-coral systems, others are becoming novel coral-dominated ecosystems driven principally by differential species responses to climate change and other drivers, but also due to species range shifts at higher latitudes, and in some cases introduced species. Returning many coral reefs to pristine baselines is unrealistic, whereas embracing novel futures enables more pragmatic approaches to maintaining or re-building the dominance of corals. Coral reefs are changing in unprecedented ways, providing the impetus to improve our understanding of reef compositions that may dominate in the future, explore new management approaches, assess changes in ecosystem services, and investigate how human societies can adapt and respond to novel futures.