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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Sicilia, A. C., Lukacs, J. N., Jones, S. and Perez Algorta, G. (2019), Decision‐making and risk in bipolar disorder: A quantitative study using fuzzy trace theory. Psychol Psychother Theory Res Pract. doi:10.1111/papt.12215 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/papt.12215 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Embargo ends: 24/01/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Decision‐making and risk in bipolar disorder: A quantitative study using fuzzy trace theory

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>24/01/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice
Publication statusPublished
Early online date24/01/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Objectives: This study characterizes risk-taking behaviours in a group of people with a self-reported diagnosis of BD using fuzzy trace theory (FTT). FTT hypothesizes that risk-taking is a ‘reasoned’ (but sometimes faulty) action, rather than an impulsive act associated with mood fluctuations. Design: We tested whether measures of FTT (verbatim and gist-based thinking) were predictive of risk-taking intentions in BD, after controlling for mood and impulsivity. We hypothesized that FTT scales would be significant predictors of risk-taking intentions even after accounting for mood and impulsivity. Methods: Fifty-eight participants with BD (age range 21–78, 68% female) completed a series of online questionnaires assessing risk intentions, mood, impulsivity, and FTT. Results: Fuzzy trace theory scales significantly predicted risk-taking intentions (medium effect sizes), after controlling for mood and impulsivity consistent with FTT (part range.26 to.49). Participants with BD did not show any statistically significant tendency towards verbatim-based thinking. Conclusions: Fuzzy trace theory gist and verbatim representations were both independent predictors of risk-taking intentions, even after controlling for mood and impulsivity. The results offer an innovative conceptualization of the mechanisms behind risk-taking in BD. Practitioner points: Risk-taking behaviour in bipolar disorder is not just a consequence of impulsivity. Measures of fuzzy trace theory help to understand risk-taking in bipolar disorder. FTT measures predict risk-taking intentions, after controlling for mood and impulsivity.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Sicilia, A. C., Lukacs, J. N., Jones, S. and Perez Algorta, G. (2019), Decision‐making and risk in bipolar disorder: A quantitative study using fuzzy trace theory. Psychol Psychother Theory Res Pract. doi:10.1111/papt.12215 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/papt.12215 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.