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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Review of Faith & International Affairs on 25/11/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15570274.2019.1681776

    Accepted author manuscript, 271 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 25/05/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Desectarianization: Looking Beyond the Sectarianization of Middle Eastern Politics

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>30/11/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>The Review of Faith & International Affairs
Issue number4
Volume17
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)23-35
Publication statusPublished
Early online date25/11/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Violent fragmentation in the Middle East has often been reduced to a consequence of “ancient hatreds” that pit Sunni against Shi’a. One of the more compelling arguments to understand the emergence of sectarian violence was proposed by Nader Hashemi and Danny Postel who suggest that the politics of the Middle East has undergone a process of sectarianization. This article builds upon the work of Hashemi and Postel to consider potential mechanisms to challenge this process of sectarianization, to work towards desectarianization. Drawing on interviews conducted across the Middle East and on a number of different disciplines, the article proposes a four-stage framework to facilitate desectarianization.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Review of Faith & International Affairs on 25/11/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15570274.2019.1681776