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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Review of Faith and International Affairs on 12/03/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15570274.2020.1729529

    Accepted author manuscript, 442 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 12/09/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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De-securitizing through Diplomacy: De-sectarianization and the View from the Islamic Republic

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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  • S. Nasirzadeh
  • E. Wastnidge
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/04/2020
<mark>Journal</mark>Review of Faith and International Affairs
Issue number1
Volume18
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)23-33
Publication statusPublished
Early online date12/03/20
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

As a country often defined in terms of its sectarian identity, the Islamic Republic provides an interesting test case for the notion of de-sectarianization. Iran’s position as the pre-eminent Shi’a-majority power in the region has presented it with opportunities to draw on its historical confessional linkages, but it also singles it out as a unique case. Building upon the theoretical and conceptual frameworks provided by the sectarianization thesis, de-securitization, and insights from diplomatic studies, this paper presents empirical examples from Iran’s Eurasian and religious
diplomacy that provide a potential starting point for desectarianization of the region’s fractious international politics.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Review of Faith and International Affairs on 12/03/2020, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15570274.2020.1729529