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    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Health Informatics Journal, ? (?), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Health Informatics Journal page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/JHI on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Design for Mobile Mental Health: Exploring the Informed Participation Approach

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Design for Mobile Mental Health : Exploring the Informed Participation Approach. / Aryana, Bijan; Brewster, Liz.

In: Health Informatics Journal, 30.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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@article{84fe416eda204875915d86af738b4121,
title = "Design for Mobile Mental Health: Exploring the Informed Participation Approach",
abstract = "Mobile applications (apps) have the potential to improve mental health services. However, there is limited evidence of efficacy or responsiveness to user needs for existing apps. A lack of design methods has contributed to this issue. Developers view mental health apps as stand-alone products and dismiss the complex context of use. Participatory design, particularly an informed participation approach, has potential to improve the design of mental health apps. In this study, we worked with young mobile users and mental health practitioners to examine the informed participation approach for designing apps. Using auto-ethnography and a set of design workshops, the project focused on eliciting design requirements as a factor for successful implementation. We compared resultant ideas and designs with existing apps. Many user requirements revealed were absent in existing apps, suggesting potential advantages to informed participation. The observation of the process, however, showed challenges in engagement that need to be overcome.",
keywords = "coping, informed participation, mobile mental health, participatory design, problem solving, requirements gathering",
author = "Bijan Aryana and Liz Brewster",
note = "The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Health Informatics Journal, ? (?), 2019, {\circledC} SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Health Informatics Journal page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/JHI on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1177/1460458219873540",
language = "English",
journal = "Health Informatics Journal",
issn = "1460-4582",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Design for Mobile Mental Health

T2 - Exploring the Informed Participation Approach

AU - Aryana, Bijan

AU - Brewster, Liz

N1 - The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Health Informatics Journal, ? (?), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Health Informatics Journal page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/JHI on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

PY - 2019/9/30

Y1 - 2019/9/30

N2 - Mobile applications (apps) have the potential to improve mental health services. However, there is limited evidence of efficacy or responsiveness to user needs for existing apps. A lack of design methods has contributed to this issue. Developers view mental health apps as stand-alone products and dismiss the complex context of use. Participatory design, particularly an informed participation approach, has potential to improve the design of mental health apps. In this study, we worked with young mobile users and mental health practitioners to examine the informed participation approach for designing apps. Using auto-ethnography and a set of design workshops, the project focused on eliciting design requirements as a factor for successful implementation. We compared resultant ideas and designs with existing apps. Many user requirements revealed were absent in existing apps, suggesting potential advantages to informed participation. The observation of the process, however, showed challenges in engagement that need to be overcome.

AB - Mobile applications (apps) have the potential to improve mental health services. However, there is limited evidence of efficacy or responsiveness to user needs for existing apps. A lack of design methods has contributed to this issue. Developers view mental health apps as stand-alone products and dismiss the complex context of use. Participatory design, particularly an informed participation approach, has potential to improve the design of mental health apps. In this study, we worked with young mobile users and mental health practitioners to examine the informed participation approach for designing apps. Using auto-ethnography and a set of design workshops, the project focused on eliciting design requirements as a factor for successful implementation. We compared resultant ideas and designs with existing apps. Many user requirements revealed were absent in existing apps, suggesting potential advantages to informed participation. The observation of the process, however, showed challenges in engagement that need to be overcome.

KW - coping

KW - informed participation

KW - mobile mental health

KW - participatory design

KW - problem solving

KW - requirements gathering

U2 - 10.1177/1460458219873540

DO - 10.1177/1460458219873540

M3 - Journal article

JO - Health Informatics Journal

JF - Health Informatics Journal

SN - 1460-4582

ER -