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Design templates for consumer use in customising additive layer manufactured products

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsChapter (peer-reviewed)

Published

Publication date06/2008
Host publication9th National Conference on Rapid Design, Prototyping and Manufacturing: Proceedings of
EditorsAllan Rennie, David Jacobson, Chris Bocking
Place of publicationBeaconsfield
PublisherMJA Print
Pages137-144
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)978-0-948314-55-1
Original languageEnglish

Conference

Conference9th National Conference on Rapid Design, Prototyping and Manufacturing
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHigh Wycombe
Period13/06/0813/06/08

Conference

Conference9th National Conference on Rapid Design, Prototyping and Manufacturing
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHigh Wycombe
Period13/06/0813/06/08

Abstract

This paper describes the creation of a design template for designing specific products for consumers. As an initial research design, it aims to develop an easy-to-operate design system, where consumers interact with design choices instead of operating conventional Computer Aided Design (CAD). This would help the end user, who would use the templates to “perform” aspects of the design and thereby endorse the manufacture of the products themselves. In terms of manufacturing products, several studies focus on involving consumers as much and as early as possible. Further, many studies have been concerned with Mass Customization (MC) manufacturing combined with Product Family Architecture (PFA), which offers consumers a wide range of product choices. However, recent developments in the field of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) have led to a renewed interest in how to manufacture customised products, and specifically, that will allow consumers to create bespoke products more easily. These technologies can enhance the understanding of non-technology compliant consumers and bring the manufacturing process closer to the consumer. In time, ALM technologies might be more commonplace as a consumers’ home appliance rather than as commercial or industrial manufacturing equipment. Consequently, to make ALM more reliable and easier to operate by consumers, design aspects need to be developed to be as simplistic to operate in the same manner that ALM technologies have. This research suggests a user friendly design system by utilising design templates to simplify the CAD stages before manufacturing occurs.