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Designing next-next generation products and services: a design-led futures framework

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

Publication date07/2012
Host publicationDRS 2012 Bangkok Chulalongkorn University Bangkok, Thailand, 1–4 July 2012
Number of pages17
Original languageEnglish

Conference

ConferenceDesign Research Society Conference 2012
CountryThailand
CityBangkok
Period1/07/124/07/12

Conference

ConferenceDesign Research Society Conference 2012
CountryThailand
CityBangkok
Period1/07/124/07/12

Abstract

Within the design industry there has been much promotion of how designers can engage with future oriented projects yet, there has been little investigation within academic design research of the methods employed. In some ways much of the discourse coming out of design practice is commercial propaganda - with the sole aim of generating new business. The design industry is good at communicating what future focussed services it is able to offer yet the methods employed are shrouded in a similar level of mystery (and scepticism) as those employed by a magician or shaman. Commercial sensitivities mean that the design industry is good as say what they can do in terms of creating future oriented ‘next-next generation’ products and services yet they do not convey how this is achieved with the same level of enthusiasm. A design led futures framework is presented to support designers in the development of next-next generation products (and services) and provides a mechanism to underpin future oriented design projects. Based upon analysis of empirical evidence drawn from 40+ expert interviews, the study identifies the growing need for organisations to engage designers to consider the future within an increasingly complex and competitive product and service developmental landscape.