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Detecting anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Journal publication date05/2006
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Journal number5
Volume21
Number of pages3
Pages227-229
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Tropical forests are beleaguered by an array of threats driven by different scales of anthropogenic perturbations, which vary in the degree to which they can be detected by remote sensing. The extent of different patterns of cryptic disturbance often far exceeds the total area deforested, as shown by two recent studies on selective logging in Amazonia. Here, we discuss different forms of disturbance in Amazonian forests and question how much of the apparently intact forest in this region remains relatively undisturbed.