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    Rights statement: Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2017.0652

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Determining typical smartphone usage: What data do we need?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Determining typical smartphone usage : What data do we need? / Wilcockson, Thomas; Ellis, David Alexander; Shaw, Heather.

In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Vol. 21, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 395-398 .

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Wilcockson, T, Ellis, DA & Shaw, H 2018, 'Determining typical smartphone usage: What data do we need?', Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 395-398 . https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2017.0652

APA

Vancouver

Author

Wilcockson, Thomas ; Ellis, David Alexander ; Shaw, Heather. / Determining typical smartphone usage : What data do we need?. In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. 2018 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 395-398 .

Bibtex

@article{c13fd709d7814c49a334790d51dea2e1,
title = "Determining typical smartphone usage: What data do we need?",
abstract = "Problematic smartphone use is an emerging issue in behavioural addiction research. At the same time, measuring smartphone use with mobile apps has become increasingly common. However, understanding how much data is necessary requires careful consideration if the field is to move forward. Here, we examine how much time should be spent measuring mobile phone operation in order to reliably infer general patterns of usage and repetitive checking behaviours. In a second analysis, we consider whether a self-report measure of problematic smartphone use is associated with real-time patterns of use. Results suggest that smartphone usage collected for a minimum of five days will reflect typical weekly usage (in hours), but habitual checking behaviours (uses lasting less than 15 seconds) can be reliably inferred within two days. These measurements did not reliably correlate with a self-reported measure. We conclude that patterns of smartphone use are repetitive and our results suggest that checking behaviour is a particularly consistent and efficient measure when quantifying typical and problematic smartphone usage.",
keywords = "smartphones, digital traces, addiction, behavioral addiction",
author = "Thomas Wilcockson and Ellis, {David Alexander} and Heather Shaw",
note = "Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2017.0652",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/cyber.2017.0652",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "395--398",
journal = "Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking",
issn = "2152-2715",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determining typical smartphone usage

T2 - What data do we need?

AU - Wilcockson, Thomas

AU - Ellis, David Alexander

AU - Shaw, Heather

N1 - Final publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2017.0652

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Problematic smartphone use is an emerging issue in behavioural addiction research. At the same time, measuring smartphone use with mobile apps has become increasingly common. However, understanding how much data is necessary requires careful consideration if the field is to move forward. Here, we examine how much time should be spent measuring mobile phone operation in order to reliably infer general patterns of usage and repetitive checking behaviours. In a second analysis, we consider whether a self-report measure of problematic smartphone use is associated with real-time patterns of use. Results suggest that smartphone usage collected for a minimum of five days will reflect typical weekly usage (in hours), but habitual checking behaviours (uses lasting less than 15 seconds) can be reliably inferred within two days. These measurements did not reliably correlate with a self-reported measure. We conclude that patterns of smartphone use are repetitive and our results suggest that checking behaviour is a particularly consistent and efficient measure when quantifying typical and problematic smartphone usage.

AB - Problematic smartphone use is an emerging issue in behavioural addiction research. At the same time, measuring smartphone use with mobile apps has become increasingly common. However, understanding how much data is necessary requires careful consideration if the field is to move forward. Here, we examine how much time should be spent measuring mobile phone operation in order to reliably infer general patterns of usage and repetitive checking behaviours. In a second analysis, we consider whether a self-report measure of problematic smartphone use is associated with real-time patterns of use. Results suggest that smartphone usage collected for a minimum of five days will reflect typical weekly usage (in hours), but habitual checking behaviours (uses lasting less than 15 seconds) can be reliably inferred within two days. These measurements did not reliably correlate with a self-reported measure. We conclude that patterns of smartphone use are repetitive and our results suggest that checking behaviour is a particularly consistent and efficient measure when quantifying typical and problematic smartphone usage.

KW - smartphones

KW - digital traces

KW - addiction

KW - behavioral addiction

U2 - 10.1089/cyber.2017.0652

DO - 10.1089/cyber.2017.0652

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 395

EP - 398

JO - Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

JF - Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

SN - 2152-2715

IS - 6

ER -