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Developers Need Support, Too: A Survey of Security Advice for Software Developers

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsConference contribution

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Publication date24/09/2017
Host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Secure Development Conference 2017
EditorsTrent Jaeger
PublisherIEEE
Pages22-26
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781538634677
ISBN (Print)9781538634684
<mark>Original language</mark>English
EventIEEE SecDev - Boston, United States

Conference

ConferenceIEEE SecDev
Abbreviated titleSecDev2017
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period24/09/1726/09/17
Internet address

Conference

ConferenceIEEE SecDev
Abbreviated titleSecDev2017
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period24/09/1726/09/17
Internet address

Abstract

Increasingly developers are becoming aware of the importance of software security, as frequent high-profile se- curity incidents emphasize the need for secure code. Faced with this new problem, most developers will use their normal approach: web search. But are the resulting web resources useful and effective at promoting security in practice? Recent research has identified security problems arising from Q&A re- sources that help with specific secure-programming problems, but the web also contains many general resources that discuss security and secure programming more broadly, and to our knowledge few if any of these have been empirically evaluated. The continuing prevalence of security bugs suggests that this guidance ecosystem is not currently working well enough: either effective guidance is not available, or it is not reaching the developers who need it. This paper takes a first step toward understanding and improving this guidance ecosystem by identifying and analyzing 19 general advice resources. The results identify important gaps in the current ecosystem and provide a basis for future work evaluating existing resources and developing new ones to fill these gaps.

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©2017 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.