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  • Fulop Digital Authorship and Social Media Final

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, French Cultural Studies, 30 (2), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the French Cultural Studies page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/FRC on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/

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Digital authorship and social media: French digital authors’ attitudes towards Facebook

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/05/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>French Cultural Studies
Issue number2
Volume30
Number of pages17
Pages (from-to)121-137
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Social networks have changed our relationship to the world wide web and the ways in which we communicate. This applies to the relationship between authors and readers and affects the ways in which authors can and need to be present in the public sphere and enact their authorship. Digital authors experience this particularly acutely, and the present article proposes an overview of the three main types of attitude they have chosen facing the largest social network, Facebook: using, refusing and abusing, each presented through a case study. François Bon embraces the platform and encourages authors to take advantage of the tools it offers in order to reach readers, network with authors, and become independent of traditional infrastructures. After years of almost addictive use, Neil Jomunsi came to quit the network and explained his decision, but also the dilemma upon his return, until eventually leaving again. Jean-Pierre Balpe’s ‘digital installation’ ‘Un Monde Uncertain’, finally, abuses the website by circumventing its terms and conditions and animating a series of fictional author profiles whose Facebook statuses are created by Balpe’s text generator software. Each of the three approaches represents a different response to the constraints and opportunities offered by the social network in light of the author’s situation, their political stance regarding Facebook, and objectives as an author.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, French Cultural Studies, 30 (2), 2019, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2019 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the French Cultural Studies page: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/FRC on SAGE Journals Online: http://journals.sagepub.com/