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  • Deville_Digital_Subprime_Tracking_the_Credit_Trackers (1)

    Rights statement: This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an extract/chapter published in The Sociology of Debt. Details of the definitive published version and how to purchase it are available online at: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/the-sociology-of-debt

    Accepted author manuscript, 812 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 8/05/21

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Digital Subprime: Tracking the Credit Trackers

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings - With ISBN/ISSNChapter

Published
Publication date2019
Host publicationThe Sociology of Debt
EditorsMark Featherstone
PublisherPolicy Press
Pages145-174
Number of pages30
ISBN (Electronic)9781447339533
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This chapter introduces a particularly ragged edge of debt involving companies seeking to exploit sets of social and technical relations that often, on the face of it, appear to bear quite little connection to finance. I call this assortment of socio-economic practices ‘digital subprime’. In introducing this phenomenon, I hope to provide a window into how a small but expanding set of startup businesses, in competition with both each other and the wider credit market, are attempting to refashion monetary ontologies, and in particular the relationship between money and credit.

Bibliographic note

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an extract/chapter published in The Sociology of Debt. Details of the definitive published version and how to purchase it are available online at: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/the-sociology-of-debt