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  • Final The use of visual methodologies in social work research

    Rights statement: The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Qualitative Research, 16 (5), 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Qualitative Research page: http://qrj.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

    Accepted author manuscript, 417 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Dirty secrets and being ‘strange’: using ethnomethodology to fight familiarity

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/09/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Qualitative Research
Issue number5
Volume16
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)526-540
Publication statusPublished
Early online date3/09/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The paper is a discussion of my attempt to move beyond familiarity by using ethnomethodology – and the emotional impact of doing so; namely, the feeling of having a ‘dirty secret’. As a social work group member interviewing social workers, the process of fieldwork was all too familiar. However, during transcription and analysis, what I had considered to be ‘business as usual’ was revealed as something more complex. The paper describes how the ethnomethodological notions of being a member, the unique adequacy requirement of methods, and breaching worked to make the familiar strange and became key to my understanding.

Bibliographic note

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Qualitative Research, 16, 5, 2016, © SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016 by SAGE Publications Ltd at the Qualitative Research page: http://qrj.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/