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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cranmer, S. (2019), Disabled children's evolving digital use practices to support formal learning. A missed opportunity for inclusion. Br J Educ Technol. doi:10.1111/bjet.12827 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjet.12827 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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Disabled children’s evolving digital use practices to support formal learning: A missed opportunity for inclusion

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>5/06/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>British Journal of Educational Technology
Number of pages16
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date5/06/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This paper takes an interdisciplinary approach combining digital education with
disability theory to investigate disabled children’s digital use practices for formal learning. Evidence suggests that children’s lives have been transformed through engagement with digital technologies, eg, computers, laptops and mobile devices. Even so, empirical studies about disabled children’s uses of technology remain limited, particularly studies that engage with disabled children’s own views in context. In response, an exploratory, participatory research study was designed to gain up-to-date insights into how visually impaired children, as an illustrative case, experienced digital technologies for learning within the context of inclusive education policy. Disabled children and teachers were interviewed in mainstream schools in England; results were analysed using social practice theory to identify digital use practices characterised as digital learning and
digital accessibility practices alongside children’s experiences. Outcomes were mixed. Youngsters saw benefits to using digital technologies, particularly tablets, for learning. Nevertheless, digital accessibility practices were potentially stigmatising and carried an extra task load to overcome barriers that occurred when teachers had not developed inclusive digital pedagogy. The paper discusses the implications of these findings and calls for further research to guide schools to use digital technologies to support inclusion.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Cranmer, S. (2019), Disabled children's evolving digital use practices to support formal learning. A missed opportunity for inclusion. Br J Educ Technol. doi:10.1111/bjet.12827 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjet.12827 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.